How does lenticular printing work? 🧐

Our latest edition with Jen Stark captures her work perfectly by seemingly being in constant motion. 'Shape Shift' is not your usual print, it's a lenticular print. So how does that work?
First we create the image for the print using a computer program to apply a technique called interlacing. We digitally cut multiple artworks from Jen into thin strips that are then woven back together to make up one single image for the print. Next a layer of lenses get's placed over this interwoven image. This is a very precise process as each individual lens has to be perfectly lined up with the thin strips from the image underneath or else the "moving" effect won't work.
The lenses, in our case PETG lenticular lenses, bend light. Lenticular lenses do this because they slightly bulge out in the middle. Up close you can even see them. Each lens looks almost like a little line that is slightly raised. One lenticular print has hundreds of lenses and every lens bends the light so that the thin strip from the image underneath can only be perceived at a single angle. This means that when you look at the print what you see is completely dependent on your angle. When moving your head or when the print moves you can see multiple angles and thus multiple artworks. This makes it look as if the artwork is moving. Hence the name Shape Shift!
Check out a video of the work on our website to see exactly what we're talking about! 🌈👀
https://avantarte.com/products/shape-shift

Collective Post - How does lenticular printing work? 🧐
Collective Post - How does lenticular printing work? 🧐
Collective Post - How does lenticular printing work? 🧐

+2

Collective Profile - @higherartkey

@higherartkey

"Chromatic Cascade"
1828 Conway Pl, Los Angeles, CA 90021
2 months ago·
Collective Profile - @sol

@sol

So sick
2 months ago·
Collective Profile - @sol

@sol

Thanks 🙏🏼
2 months ago·
Collective Profile - @jjh85

@jjh85

had no idea, thats so dope 🔥
2 months ago·